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Our Values

our values page1


Integrity

“Create a life that feels good on the inside, not one that just looks good on the outside.” –Anonymous

Integrity is not always easy.  We must regularly make difficult choices about right and wrong and rarely are those choices clear cut.  It is an oversimplification to say that integrity means doing the right thing at all times and no matter the consequences.  The real practice is to acknowledge our tough choices, acknowledge our internal conflicts and tensions, and make efforts to move in the direction that benefits the integrity of Mindfulness- based Approaches and the Mindfulness community. In this way we learn to integrate and embody our practice of mindfulness.

Humility

“Being humble means that we are not on earth to see how important we can become, but to see how much difference we can make in the lives of others.” –  Gorden B Hinckley

Humility requires that we put a check on the ego and live from a place of openness and compassion.  When we live mindfully from a place of humility we are naturally open to connection with others and we spontaneously move to serve in whatever ways present themselves. Humility means that we accept and embrace the grey areas of life and acknowledge that we don’t always have the answers.  The humble person admits their own and others mistakes and limitations, sees them as learning edges, and tries to learn from them. Perhaps most important, humility requires a consistent practice of self-reflection and the understanding that we are always evolving.

Inter-connectedness

“Learn how to see. Realize that everything connects to everything else.” – Leonardo da Vinci

Underlying interconnectedness is the worldview that there is Oneness in all things.  When we live from this mindful place and experience the vast connections that link us to all other life, it becomes possible to experience the fact that our individual lives are only meaningful in relation to, and through interaction with, others. Interconnectedness allows us to understand that life is developing in a dynamic way; between the synergy of the internal life and the external.  We create and impact the flow of life constantly, just as this flow impacts and changes each one of us.

Influencing a long term healthy Worldview

“What our Seventh Generation will have is a consequence of our actions today.” – Winona LaDuke, Annishnabe

We each have a worldview, which is influenced by our communities, cultures, and life experiences. Our worldview is the belief system we use to interpret reality. Our worldviews determine what we think is possible, which in turn influences what we manifest in life.  Collective individual worldviews shape the human condition. Because of this, the mindful practice of thinking beyond ourselves and sensing our inter-connectedness is essential.  We must cultivate a sense of presence that allows us to move away from unhelpful habits and move towards wholeness and integration.  When we cultivate a worldview that encompasses the long-term we begin to manifest a greater good for all.

Think Globally, Act Locally

“I am only one, but I am one. I cannot do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do.” – Edward Everett Hale

It’s clear that our lives have a far reaching global dimension.  As technology shrinks our world, it’s impossible to remain blind to the human condition across the planet. It is essential to think globally, now more than ever.    Developing our mindfulness practice daily; moment to moment, is a stance of acting locally to benefit the whole. This is the ideal way to make our global condition a personal one.